top of page
  • Writer's pictureAmar Adiya

Snap Election Looms in Mongolia as Ruling Party Grapples with Constitutional Reform and Internal Divisions


mongolia election

Mongolia could be heading for its first-ever snap election as the ruling Mongolian People's Party (MPP) explores ways to salvage its flagship constitutional reform plan amid public criticism and internal power struggles.


At the heart of the issue is the proposed constitutional referendum, a key campaign promise made by the MPP in 2016. However, public outcry over the estimated $10 million cost of holding the referendum has put the party on the defensive. 



Seeking to capitalize on the situation and potentially cut costs, a faction within the MPP has reportedly begun pushing for a snap election to coincide with the referendum in October or November.  47 MPP lawmakers, largely aligned with Prime Minister Ukhnaagiin Khurelsukh, have already signed a petition requesting the dissolution of parliament - the first step towards triggering a snap election.


The move has exposed deep divisions within the MPP.  Some suggest that Khurelsukh, who enjoys high approval ratings, sees an early election as a way to consolidate his power and sideline opponents within the party, particularly those aligned with former Prime Minister Erdenebat. 


However, several prominent MPP lawmakers opposed to the move, warning of a "political disaster" if the party rushes into an election before resolving its internal disputes. 


Adding to the uncertainty, Parliament Speaker has refused to rule out the possibility of a snap election, citing potential cost savings and concerns about low voter turnout for a standalone referendum in the challenging weather conditions of October and November. 


While the opposition has welcomed the prospect of an early election, analysts remain skeptical about its potential benefits for the ruling party. 



"The MPP is deeply divided," explains Amar Adiya. "A snap election could exacerbate these divisions and lead to a weaker mandate even if they retain their majority." 


Moreover, the cost saving rationale is being questioned. Legal experts point out that regular parliamentary elections are already mandated for June 2020, regardless of whether a snap election is held. 


With the legal deadline to announce an election fast approaching, the MPP faces a critical decision. A misstep could not only jeopardize its grip on power but also derail its ambitious constitutional reform agenda.


Sign up to Mongolia Weekly today!

Comentários


bottom of page